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2018 Data Summit

Agenda
Logistics Agenda
Time
Event
7:30 am - 8:30 am
Registration and breakfast
8:30am - 8:40am
Introduction by Stephen Schatz, Executive Director, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education
8:40 am - 8:55 am
Welcoming Remarks by Rodney Luke, Assistant Superintendent, Hawai‘i State Department of Education - Presentation
8:55 am - 9:30 am
Plenary Session I:Data Governance & Analysis Branch, Hawai‘i State Department of Education - Presentation
9:30 am - 10:05 am
Plenary Session II:Stephen Schatz, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education - Presentation
10:05 am - 10:30 am
Break
10:30 am - 11:20 am
Concurrent Session I
11:20 am - 1:00 pm
Lunch
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Concurrent Session II
1:50 pm - 2:10 pm
Break
2:10 pm - 3:00 pm
Concurrent Session III

Concurrent Sessions

Room
Concurrent Session I
10:30 am - 11:20 am
Concurrent Session II
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Concurrent Session III
2:10 pm - 3:00 pm
Hibiscus/
Ilima
Charting a Native Hawaiian Post-Secondary Journey: Findings from the UH Comprehensive Title III Evaluation
(Lokelani Kenolio, Punihei Lipe, Nolan Malone, Leslie Opulauoho, Princess Soares)
Presentation
A High School's Journey - Deriving Information Value from Data
(Shane Hedani, Diane Yoshimura)
Presentation
Designing Middle School Math Interventions to Open Doors to STEM Careers
(Dan Doerger, Meera Garud)
Presentation - Handout
Pikake
Using Data to Shape UH's Returning Adults Enrollment Initiative
(Tammi Chun)
Presentation
The Impact of Early College: A Matched-Comparison Study
(Dan Rempala)
Presentation
Strengthening College Bound Preparatory Activities
(Keala Chock, Lara Sugimoto)
Presentation
Ohia
Want to Increase Access to Quality Early Childhood Programs? Build
Hawaii's Workforce!
(Lauren Moriguchi)
Presentation
Improving the Education to Workforce Pipeline in Hawai‘i's Early Childhood System
(Jayne Arasaki, Robyn Chun, Kathy Murphy, Lauren Moriguchi, Terry Lock)
Presentation - Handouts (zip file)
Stakeholder Feedback: Education-to-Workforce Alignment Report - STEM Focus
(RJ Rodriguez)
Presentation
Kamani
Using Data to Improve English Learners' Access to Education-to-Workforce Pipeline
(Andreas Wiegand, Emily Lam)
Presentation - Handout
Native Control of Native Education: Designing a Native Hawaiian Research Agenda
(Sylvia M. Hussey)
Presentation
Native Control of Native Education: Designing a Native Hawaiian Research Agenda
(Sylvia M. Hussey)
Presentation

Plenary Session Descriptions

The Hawai‘i State Department of Education's Statewide Longitudinal Data System's Data Use Journey

Faced with the need to create a competetive workforce and improve the quality of Hawai‘iʻs education system, the Hawai‘i State Department of Education (HIDOE) has created a new Strategic Plan that provides the foundation of expectations and supports for public education in closing the achievement gap and ensuring equity and excellence for all students.

HIDOE received its first US Department of Education Statewide Longitudinal Data System (SLDS) grant in May 2009. HIDOEʻs current K12 longitudinal data system (LDS) was developed and deployed under this grant and designed to help K12 educators to use data to improve student outcomes. Two additional grants in 2012 and 2015 provided the opportunity to develop a culture of rigorous data use by providing extensive training and professional development program focused on increasing data quality by data entry staff and the use of data by practicing educators, policymakers at all levels, teacher and administrator candidates, and other stakeholders.

Work related to HIDOE's data use priorities will help achieve the goals in HIDOE's Strategic Plan. Recently updated for 2017-2020, the Strategic Plan centers on closing achievement gaps and provides objectives and expectations for three main goals—student success, staff success, and successful systems of support—and establishes statewide success indicators and targets.

The LDS staff members have developed and executed a strategic and a responsive approach to data use training for complex areas and schools by enhancing existing instructional and programmatic processes.

Presenters:
Jan Fukada - Data Governance & Analysis Branch Director, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
Diane Yoshimura - Institutional Analyst, Hawaiʻi Department of Education
Shane Hedani - Institutional Analyst, Hawaiʻi Department of Education

Partnering to Improve Hawai‘i’s Education-to-Workforce Pipeline

Over the past nine years Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education has worked to bring together state agency partners that collectively represent Hawai‘i's education-to-workforce pipeline. Through the Hawai‘i Data eXchange Partnership, a partnership of the Hawai‘i State Department of Education, University of Hawai‘i, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Hawai‘i State Department of Health, and the Department of Human Services, these agencies agreed to share data to create a Statewide Longitudinal Data System (SLDS). The new information made available by linking data across agencies is critical to strengthening the educational transitions from Pre-K to postsecondary education, and the workforce.

Hawai‘i’s journey to partner across education and workforce organizations has been fruitful. Over the last five years data from the SLDS has provided information that has informed the development of new policies, programs, and courses. As the state has begun to understand the importance of aligning education to workforce, data play a key role in informing conversations about college readiness and career readiness. Of particular interest is how the state's most vulnerable populations are faring, and identifying ways to close achievement and opportunity gaps for these individuals. Partnerships that are guided by shared data can help to strengthen Hawai‘i’s education-to-workforce pipeline.

Presenter:
Stephen Schatz, Executive Director, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education


Concurrent Session Descriptions

Concurrent Session I

Charting a Native Hawaiian Post-Secondary Journey: Findings from the UH Comprehensive Title III Evaluation
The U.S. federal Title III program provides financial support to minority-serving institutions to strengthen their capacities to promote success among minority students. For over 20 years, the 10-campus University of Hawai‘i (UH) system has leveraged Title III funding to improve Native Hawaiian representation on campuses, persistence, and successful achievement of desired goals. In 2015, the UH system was awarded a supplemental grant under Title III to conduct a system-wide evaluation of Title III programs. In this presentation, the evaluation team highlights findings and “Aha!” moments from this comprehensive review, which included reviews of program reports, focus groups and interviews with stakeholders on each campus, student and faculty/staff surveys, and analyses of student administrative and academic records. While conventional outcomes of access, persistence, and timely completion are examined, so too are more culturally responsive outcomes such as identity formation, sense of belonging, leadership, and collective kuleana.
Presenters:
Lokelani Kenolio – Title III Evaluation Team Member, University of Hawai‘i System
Punihei Lipe – Title III Evaluation Team Member, University of Hawai‘i System
Nolan Malone – Title III Evaluation Team Member, University of Hawai‘i System
Leslie Opulauoho – Title III Evaluation Team Member, University of Hawai‘i System
Princess Soares – Title III Evaluation Team Member, University of Hawai‘i System
Using Data to Shape UH's Returning
Adults Enrollment Initiative
Hawai‘i, like many states, has begun targeting "returning adults" for college enrollment. Hawai‘i has 95,000 adults, ages 25-44, with "some college, no degree," and a large number are University of Hawai‘i (UH) students who have accumulated credits but did not attain an educational credential. This presentation will describe UH's returning adults initiative and how data has been used to shape and evaluate the efforts.

A case study which will be discussed is a December 2017 proof-of-concept project to offer "stopped out students" a first class free. The result of outreach to nearly 1,000 students was 150 students who registered for a total of 1,003 credits in Spring 2018. Data were used to identify and reach out to eligible students, monitor progress of the offer, and evaluate the impacts. However, the limits of data to shape the project, and interaction of other project dependencies will be discussed.

Participants will also learn about returning adults efforts in other states and provide input on future direction of UH's returning adults initiative.

Presenter:
Tammi Chun – Academic Program Officer, University of Hawai‘i Community College System

Want to Increase Access to Quality Early Childhood Programs? Build Hawaii's Workforce!
The research clearly shows that it is only through high-quality programs that we can see the positive life and societal outcomes associated with early learning - low-quality programs can result in increased behavior issues and inappropriate suspensions and/or referrals of children to special education. As EOEL works to expand access to early learning for our keiki, it must also focus intently on building quality. Research indicates that a key component of quality is qualified educators, but the great challenge of recruiting and retaining a strong workforce to serve our children is multi-fold. To address the challenges and increase the workforce of providers who have specialized training in early childhood education, EOEL is collaborating with early childhood stakeholders and institutions of higher education. Together with its partners, EOEL will implement strategies that include establishing career advancement pathways tied to education, and professional development that support the early childhood workforce, while reducing barriers to training and education.

Presenter:
Lauren Moriguchi – Executive Director, Executive Office on Early Learning

Using Data to Improve English Learners' Access to Education-to-Workforce Pipeline
Students identified as English Learners (ELs) bring funds of knowledge into the classroom. Funds of knowledge are life experiences, skills, and knowledge learned from home (Gonzalez, Moll, & Amanti, 2005; Moll, 1992) that serve as resources for learning. In addition, ELs have specific learning needs that require targeted supports. To support ELs' participation in workforce development, what should educators consider when planning for and implementing instruction for ELs? How can educators use data to address ELs' needs and prepare them for lifelong success? During this presentation, participants will learn about ways to implement data-informed instruction to support education for ELs; specifically, how the Hawai'i Department of Education, through the Asian American Pacific Islander EL Data Disaggregation grant funded by the US Department of Education Office of English Language Acquisition, is engaging school and complex-area level subject-matter experts to increase data use and close achievement and opportunity gaps for EL.

Presenter:
Andreas Wiegand – Educational Specialist/Project Director, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
Emily Lam – Educational Specialist/Project Manager, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education


Concurrent Session II

A High School's Journey-Deriving Information Value from Data
Learn how a high school started a data journey. From an inquiry question to gathering teacher and student voice, we explored various options to support struggling students. We will share how both qualitative and quantitative data guide decision making.

Presenters:
Shane Hedani - Institutional Analyst, Hawaiʻi Department of Education
Diane Yoshimura - Institutional Analyst, Hawaiʻi Department of Education

The Impact of Early College: A Matched-Comparison Study
The expansion of dual credit programs, particularly the Early College program (where sheltered college classes are offered to groups of high school students), has been an important development for public education in the state of Hawai‘i. Engaging students in rigorous college coursework while still in high school has proven to be a significant driver in several important academic outcomes, from high school graduation to college persistence, by providing students with momentum towards their future college degree.  However, there have been questions raised about whether Hawai‘i's Early College program, in particular, is serving students that are already college-bound (which would account for higher academic outcomes). In 2016, Hawai‘i P-20 contracted the American Institutes for Research (AIR) to examine the impact of Early College courses funded by Hawai‘i P-20 using a matched comparison group.  Early College students were matched with non-Early College students for the Classes of 2015, 2016, and 2017 based on a list of demographic and academic variables (including ethnicity and economic status), and outcomes were tracked for both groups.   Results from all three classes confirm that Early College participation had a significant impact on virtually all outcome variables examined, including high school completion, college enrollment, and college persistence.

Presenter:
Dan Rempala – Evaluation Specialist, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education

Improving the Education to Workforce Pipeline in Hawaiʻi’s Early Childhood System
The research is clear about the positive impacts of high-quality early childhood education (ECE) programs on the outcomes of young children, the benefits of which extend to our society. Studies tell us that a talented, well-trained, diverse, and stable workforce is key to delivering such programs. Unfortunately, the challenge of recruiting and retaining a strong workforce is multi-fold. Across all types of ECE programs and roles, low wages and economic insecurity characterize the ECE workforce, who arguably have society's most critical work to care for and educating our future generations. Furthermore, there is a lack of clearly identified career advancement pathways and limited access to high-quality degree-granting programs and ongoing professional development. A panel of individuals from the ECE field will share their perspectives on how national, state, and local efforts are supporting the current and future early childhood workforce in Hawaiʻi.

Presenter:
Jayne Arasaki - Director of Operations, Seagull Preschools
Robyn Chun - Director of Graduate ECE Programs, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Kathy Murphy - Executive Director of Hawaiʻi Association of the Education of Young Children
Lauren Moriguchi – Director, Executive Office on Early Learning
Dr. Terry Lock – Instructor, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (Moderator)

Native Control of Native Education: Designing a Native Hawaiian Research Agenda
noun re•search \ ri-ˈsərch , ˈrē-ˌsərch \
1: careful or diligent search 2 : studious inquiry or examination; especially : investigation or experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of facts, revision of accepted theories or laws in the light of new facts, or practical application of such new or revised theories or laws 3 : the collecting of information about a particular subject. Facilitated by the Native Hawaiian Education Council, attendees will be asked to contribute to the design of a Native Hawaiian Research Agenda, with a focus on work perspectives, for the benefit of families and communities and to the realization of abundant communities.

Presenter:
Sylvia M. Hussey – Executive Director, Native Hawaiian Education Council


Concurrent Session III

Designing Middle School Math Interventions to Open Doors to STEM Careers
College and career ready high school graduates are more likely to complete college. Likewise, students who finish geometry in 9th grade are more prepared to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education is building on the momentum of a successful 12th-grade-to-college math transition course. Hawaiʻi P-20 has convened a cross-sector workgroup to look farther back in the education pipeline to make sure more middle school students enter ninth grade prepared for success either in algebra 1 (non-STEM pathway) or geometry (STEM pathway). This session will discuss how the workgroup is using data at each step: planning, implementing, and assessing the middle school intervention.

Presenters:
Dan Doerger - Alignment Director, Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education
Meera Garud - Institutional Analyst, Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education

Education to Workforce Alignment Report (STEM Focus)
This report will engage attendees in the analysis of alignment between education and workforce, with a focus on STEM careers. This is closely connected to the current work taking place in HIDOE schools, UH campuses and industry engagement such as the Sector Partnership meetings. The report is scheduled to be published in late 2018. Current report metrics will be shared and those attending will be invited to participate in practical applications of the prototype data.

Presenter:
RJ Rodriguez – Alignment Specialist, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education

Strengthening College Bound Preparatory Activities
This presentation will review and highlight career and technical education trends for high school students transitioning to community colleges. Data will be used to identify preliminary success indicators for persistence to college enrollment upon graduation direct from high school. This snapshot will allow participants to engage in a discussion about future alignment efforts to expand career influences through integration of curriculum from K-12 through community college and beyond.

Presenters:
Keala Chock – Dean of Communication & Services, Honolulu Community College
Lara Sugimoto – Dean of Student Services, Honolulu Community College

Native Control of Native Education: Designing a Native Hawaiian Research Agenda
noun re•search \ ri-ˈsərch , ˈrē-ˌsərch \
1: careful or diligent search 2 : studious inquiry or examination; especially : investigation or experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of facts, revision of accepted theories or laws in the light of new facts, or practical application of such new or revised theories or laws 3 : the collecting of information about a particular subject. Facilitated by the Native Hawaiian Education Council, attendees will be asked to contribute to the design of a Native Hawaiian Research Agenda, with a focus on work perspectives, for the benefit of families and communities and to the realization of abundant communities.

Presenter:
Sylvia M. Hussey – Executive Director, Native Hawaiian Education Council

Venue

Salvation Army Kroc Center Hawai'i
91-3257 Kualaka'i Parkway
Ewa Beach, HI 96706

Registration

Registration for this event is now closed. The registration deadline was Tuesday, May 8, 2018.

Cost

There is no charge to attend this event.

Meals

Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Neighbor Island Travel

Limited funds are available for same-day travel for neighbor island participants (i.e. roundtrip airfare, parking, ground transportation). Requests will be handled in the order they are received.

Special Needs/Requirements

If you have any special needs or requirements in order to attend the summit, please contact our event coordinators.

Cancellations

Should circumstances arise and you are unable to attend, please notify us in advance so we can plan accordingly.

Contact Information

Email: hawaiidxp-events@lists.hawaii.edu


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