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Agenda
Logistics Agenda
Time
Event
7:30 am - 8:30 am
Registration and Breakfast
8:30am - 8:40am
Welcoming Remarks and Introduction
Stephen Schatz, Executive Director, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education
8:40 am - 9:20 am
Plenary Session I - Federal Acts Updates and Their Impacts for Hawai‘i
State of Hawai‘i Workforce Development Council (Allicyn Tasaka) - Presentation
Hawai‘i State Department of Education (Rodney Luke) - Presentation
University of Hawai‘i - State Office for Career and Technical Education (Bernadette Howard) - Presentation
9:20 am - 10:25 am
Plenary Session II - Destination Action: A Data Journey
Hawai'i State Department of Education - Presentation
10:25 am - 10:45 am
Break
10:45 am - 11:40 am
Concurrent Session I
11:40 am - 12:55 pm
12:55 pm - 1:50 pm
Concurrent Session II
1:50 pm - 2:05 pm
Break
2:05 pm - 3:00 pm
Concurrent Session III

Concurrent Sessions

Room
Concurrent Session I
10:45 am - 11:40 am
Concurrent Session II
12:55 pm - 1:50 pm
Concurrent Session III
2:05 pm - 3:00 pm
Pikake
Using Data to Move Conversation and Action About Adults Returning to College
(Tammi Chun)
Presentation
Teacher Access to Professional Learning Support in Early Childhood Education: What We Have Learned and Where To Next
(Coleen Momohara, Dolores Brockman, Tiffany Hirota, Phyllis Kawamoto, Annyvette Paglinawan)
Early Learning Investments Will Require Investments in the Early Childhood Workforce: Implications of the U.S. Preschool Development Grant Tuition Stipend Pilot Program
(Robyn Chun, Charis-Ann Sole, Dena Akiu)
Presentation | Handouts
Hibiscus
Using Data to Inform Action:
Chronic Absenteeism
(Aaron Tominaga, James Suster, Toby Portner, Brianna Levy, Diane Yoshimura)
Presentation
The Hawai‘i Education Research Network: Highlights on Micronesian School Success
(Katherine Ratliffe, Polly Quigley)
Reporting Outcomes for Hawai‘i’s
English Learners
(Meera Garud)
Presentation
Ilima
Building on Data from Math and English Redesign: Structure, Models, and Pedagogy
(Josh Kaakua, Pearl Iboshi, Samantha Bowe, Jeff Stearns)
Presentation
Hawai‘i Education to Career Pathway Alignment
(Nicole Atwood, Lynsey Bow, RJ Rodriguez, Kelly Miyamura)
Presentation | Templates
Ohia
Perkins V is Law. Now What?
(Bernadette Howard, Richard Seder)
Presentation
Out of School and Out of a Job: Figuring Out What’s Happening with Disconnected Youth in Hawai‘i
(Wayne Liou)
Presentation
Leveraging Data and Learning to Improve On-Time Graduation for All Students
(Jana Chang, Tammi Chun)
Presentation
Kamani
Hōʻike Performance Assessment: Fostering Equity and Access to College, Career, and Community Success
(Charlene Hoe, Denise Espania, Liezl Houglum, Chelsea N.K. Keehne)
Presentation | Handouts
P-20 Data Team and Hawai‘i
Department of Education Data Corner
P-20 Data Team and Hawai‘i
Department of Education Data Corner

Plenary Session Descriptions

Federal Acts and Their Impacts on Hawai‘i’s Education and Workforce

Three landmark acts passed in the last few years; the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and Perkins V: Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act; have put a spotlight on the education-to-workforce pipeline and at-risk populations. However, the actual effects of such far-reaching Federal legislation are often unclear until the work to meet new guidelines and mandates begins.

Panelists from the State of Hawai‘i Workforce Development Council, Hawai‘i State Department of Education, and State Office for Career and Technical Education will share a brief overview of three landmark Federal acts and delve into how they have impacted, and will continue to impact, Hawai‘i’s education systems and workforce.

Presenters:
Allicyn Tasaka – Executive Director, State of Hawai‘i Workforce Development Council
Rodney Luke – Assistant Superintendent, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
Bernadette Howard – University of Hawai‘i, State Office for Career and Technical Education
Destination Action: A Data Journey

In 2009, the Hawai‘i State Department of Education (HIDOE) implemented a Longitudinal Data System (LDS). In the following years, training efforts focused on navigating and using the system to get HIDOE staff comfortable with available data. As educators became more knowledgeable about the data, trainings shifted to focus on data use to support classroom instruction. Collaborating with users to determine what data was relevant, the LDS team worked on building reports and data views that better align with the Department and their goals. The Early Alert Absences report is one such tool HIDOE staff uses to address chronic absenteeism.

Panelists from the Education for Homeless Children and Youth program and Waipahu Elementary School will speak about how the data provided by the Early Alert Absences report and the use of the LDS have changed their approach in countering chronic absenteeism, as well as how they continue to use it to inform their work.

LDS staff members will facilitate a data placemat activity with the audience, showcasing how some of the richest conversations can be sparked by exploring data together with data users. Discussions become more focused when data users drive conversions about the data rather than are told what data they need.

Presenters:
Toby Portner – State Coordinator, Education for Homeless Children and Youth, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
Shane Hedani – Institutional Analyst, Longitudinal Data System, Office of Strategy, Innovation and Performance, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
Diane Yoshimura – Institutional Analyst, Office of Strategy, Innovation and Performance, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
Aaron Tominaga – Principal, Waipahu Elementary, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
James Suster – Vice Principal, Waipahu Elementary, Hawai‘i State Department of Education

Concurrent Session Descriptions

Concurrent Session I

Using Data to Move Conversation and Action About Adults Returning to College

University of Hawaii System's returning adults initiative seeks to re-engage, re-enroll and graduate currently "stopped out" students with "some college, no degree." The presentation provides an update on the initiative and shares how data are used make the case for the initiative as a UH priority, for direct marketing, and for continuous improvement as the initiative progresses.

Presenter:
Tammi Chun, Ed.D. – Director of Academic Programs, University of Hawaii Office of Vice President for Community Colleges
Using Data to Inform Action: Chronic Absenteeism
As a follow up to Destination Action: A Data Journey, Waipahu Elementary and the Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program will provide additional insights about their chronic absenteeism data use journey and how they have used data to inform action. Discussions will center around how data has helped them to address short terms needs and the role they see data playing in meeting longer term goals for their students.
Presenters:
Aaron Tominaga – Principal, Waipahu Elementary, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
James Suster – Vice Principal, Waipahu Elementary, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
Toby Portner – State Coordinator, Education for Homeless Children and Youth, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
Brianna Levy – Social Worker, Education for Homeless Children and Youth, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
Diane Yoshimura – Institutional Analyst, State Longitudinal Data System, Office of Strategy, Innovation and Performance, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
Perkins V is Law. Now What?

We've been anticipating Perkins reauthorization for many years. Now that we have a new law - referred to as Perkins V - what does this mean for the K12, community college, and workforce systems going forward? How does the state intend to address the changes made by Congress? Who is involved is the planning? What decisions have been made thus far? This session will answer these questions and more. Come be part of the discussion.

Presenter:
Bernadette Howard – State Director, State Office for Career and Technical Education, University of Hawai‘i
Richard C. Seder, Ph.D. – Specialist Faculty, Systems Design & Improvement, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Hōʻike Performance Assessment: Fostering Equity and Access to College, Career, and Community Success

Hawaiian-focused Charter Schools (HFCS) were created in the early 2000s to offer families learning environments that emphasize Hawaiian language, culture, and values. While each of the 17 HFCS is unique in its identity and student outcomes, they collectively exist to perpetuate Hawaiian culture and practices in the 21st century. The HFCS Vision of the Graduate articulates common goals of college, career, community, and cultural readiness.

This presentation focuses on the development and use of alternatives to Hawaiʻi state assessments to reflect inclusive, relevant, and rigorous student learning. Presenters will share 1) current trends in the national performance assessment landscape, 2) promising performance assessment practices within HFCS and 3) an invitation to participate in the June 2019 inaugural meeting of the Hawaiʻi Performance Assessment Collaborative.

Presenter:
Charlene Hoe – Co-founder, Hakipu‘u Learning Center
Dr. Denise Espania – Principal, Mālama Honua
Liezl Houglum – Principal Research Associate, Kamehameha Schools Kūamahi Community Education
Chelsea N. K. Keehne – Network School Liaison, Kamehameha Schools Kūamahi Community Education

Concurrent Session II

Teacher Access to Professional Learning Support in Early Childhood Education: What We Have Learned and Where to Next

One of the key components of the EOEL Public Pre-Kindergarten Program is professional learning support for the DOE schools' principals and teachers through the Early Learning Academy. As most of the prekindergarten classroom teachers have not had experiences in the specialized professional preparation and foundational work of early childhood education (ECE), providing access to build their knowledge base and skill set in ECE has been and continues to be a focus of our work together. Along with a panel of pre-K classroom and resource teachers, we will look at the current data reflecting this work, inquiries that have surfaced, and the next phase of our work together.

Presenter:
Coleen Momohara – Educational Specialist, Executive Office on Early Learning
Dolores Brockman – Resource Teacher, Executive Office on Early Learning
Tiffany Hirota – Pre-K Teacher, Linapuni Elementary School
Phyllis Kawamoto – Resource Teacher, Executive Office on Early Learning
Annyvette Paglinawan – Pre-K Teacher, Waialua Elementary School
The Hawaii Education Research Network: Highlights on Micronesian School Success

The Hawaii Education Research Network (HERN) began in May, 2018, with the goal to explore a research practice partnership supporting mutually beneficial research between the UH Manoa College of Education and the Hawaii State Department of Education. After a series of meetings, five research topic areas emanated, one of which includes interest in how to engage Pacific Islander students.

Students from Micronesia, who are politically affiliated with the U.S. by Compacts of Free Association, are increasing in Hawai'i schools. Professionals who provide services to these children and their families often know very little about their previous education in their home islands, health, languages, cultures, and family relationships. In addition, there is no literature on the current status of this population in Hawai'i schools. This descriptive study will use de-identified individual-level data relating to students enrolled in Hawai'i DOE K-12 schools between 2007 and 2018 who self-identified as Micronesian or a related ethnicity. We will explore associations between their English-language status, history of taking college-level classes in high school or completing an Advanced Placement class, graduation status, enrollment in higher education, and completion of post-secondary education. In addition, other research conducted with this group of students in Hawai’i will be reviewed.

Presenter:
Katherine Ratliffe – Professor and Chair, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Polly Quigley – Education Specialist, School Community Council, Hawai‘i State Department of Education
Building on Data from Math and English Redesign: Structure, Models, and Pedagogy
In Fall 2016, UH Community Colleges launched bold, statewide efforts to decrease or eliminate the amount of time students spend in remedial math and English. Redesigns included changes to structure and delivery of courses, as well as changes to assessment instruments and placement policies. For both math and English, success rates for students of the Fall 2018 cohorts have almost doubled, compared to students from Fall 2013. With two years of data, UH System is working with community college faculty as well as administrators, to better understand our data and improve upon our results. How can we increase the number of students enrolling in math and English in the first year? How effective are the new alternative measures for placement? What does success look like for students beyond college level math and English. In addition to changes to courses and delivery, what is the impact of math pathways? Accelerating onramp to college level courses by reducing remediation is an important step towards completion. Is it enough and what are other factors that will help us reach our statewide goals for completion and student success?
Presenters:
Josh Kaakua – Interim Academic Affairs Program Officer, University of Hawaiʻi Community Colleges
Pearl Iboshi – Director of Institutional Research, University of Hawaiʻi System
Samantha Bowe – Math Faculty, University of Hawaiʻi Maui College
Jeff Stearns – English Faculty, Honolulu Community College
Out of School and Out of a Job: Figuring Out What's Happening with Disconnected Youth in Hawai‘i
Disconnected youth, also known as unattached youth, are young adults who are disconnected from society by not being attached to an educational institution or a job. Broadly speaking, disconnected youth are not attending school and are not employed. After the southern and Appalachian states and Alaska, Hawaii has the highest disconnected youth rate in the nation. Approximately 14.5% of people aged 16-24 in Hawaii are neither in school nor at work, more than 10% higher than the national average. Focusing on decreasing the number of disconnected youth is important, as being unattached to education, employment, or training at such a young age can have a persistent effect through an individual’s life. This session will look at the characteristics of these disconnected youth, and what their reasons are for not being in school or at work might be.
Presenter:
Wayne Liou, Ph.D. – Employment Analyst and Economist, Workforce Development Council
Hawai‘i P-20 Data Team Corner

Have questions about how to (better) use the dashboards offered on http://hawaiidxp.org/data/ to quickly find what you’re looking for? Can cross-sector data answer questions that will better inform your work? Come talk to Hawaii P-20 Data Team members to discuss what questions data can help answer for you.

Hawai‘i Department of Education Data Corner

Have questions about data in the Hawaii Department of Education? Come talk to team members to discuss what we can do to help support you.


Concurrent Session III

Early Learning Investments Will Require Investments in the Early Childhood Workforce: Implications of the US Preschool Development Grant Tuition Stipend Pilot Program

Research supports long term investment in early learning, but children need a system of comprehensive, high quality programs throughout the first 5 years of life in order to reap the benefits of public investment in early learning (Heckman, 2019). Adults with specialized coursework and credentials in early childhood education consistent with the research are essential to success, yet there are many obstacles to recruiting, developing and sustaining a qualified workforce. These factors must be considered as essential to commitments to expanding programs and services for young children and their families.

Our presentation contextualizes the state's workforce development challenges within the national landscape and highlights the lessons learned from the preliminary evaluation of a 1-year US Preschool Tuition Stipend grant made possible by the Hawaiʻi Charter School Commission. The grant, a one-time infusion of funds to provide $226,000 in direct tuition stipends statewide to early childhood education college students in University of Hawai'i shares preliminary data, challenges, successes and implications. Lessons learned from this pilot can inform work going forward to develop and sustain the highly qualified early childhood workforce needed to realize the Governor's ambitious vision for early learning.

Presenters:
Robyn S. B. Chun – Director, Graduate Early Childhood Education Programs, College of Education, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Charis-Ann Sole – Graduate Student, Master in Early Childhood Education Program, College of Education, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Dena Akiu – Graduate Student, Master in Early Childhood Education Program, College of Education, University of Hawaiʻiat Mānoa
Reporting Outcomes for Hawai‘i’s English Learners
Hawai‘i is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse states. This interactive session will introduce two new resources that help educators explore the linguistic diversity of Hawai‘i’s public schools and examine academic outcomes for English Learners (ELs). The presenter will describe how being an embedded analyst in a workgroup of EL subject matter experts helped her better understand the group’s information needs. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of Hawai‘i’s EL population and ideas for how to report on diverse populations.
Presenter:
Meera Garud – Institutional Analyst, Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education
Leveraging Data and Learning to Improve On-Time Graduation for All Students
Aimed at increasing Hawaii's graduation rate, the On-Track dashboard, in conjunction with detailed student profiles, gives schools quick access to students who are heading off track during the school year. Learn how policy, practitioners, and research drove the design of the dashboard and how schools are using data to increase on time graduation for all students.
Presenters:
Jana Chang, Ph.D. - Institutional Analyst, Hawaiʻi State Department of Education
Tammi Chun, Ed.D. – Director of Academic Programs, University of Hawaii Office of Vice President for Community Colleges
Hawai‘i Education to Career Pathway Alignment
A career pathway is a sequence of learning experiences that span secondary and postsecondary systems, blend rigorous core academic and career and technical instruction, offer focused career guidance and advising systems, and include high-quality work-based learning experiences. It culminates in post-secondary or industry credentials of value to employers. Development of career pathways are reverse engineered, reflecting an occupational theme informed by labor market data within a regional high-growth or high-demand industry. This session will explore the process of using evidence to inform school/program design and offer appropriate, clear and coherent career pathways that support student success. We will start big picture, by looking at the available data for communities and then finish with an in-depth look at a few high-demand, living wage careers. The session is most appropriate for high school and postsecondary audiences, particularly individuals who are involved in pathway design.
Presenters:
Kelly Miyamura – Pathways Strategy Director, Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education
Nicole Atwood – Early College Program Director, Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education
RJ Rodriguez – Alignment Specialist, Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education
Lynsey Bow – Counseling Program Manager, Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for Education
Hawai‘i P-20 Data Team Corner

Have questions about how to (better) use the dashboards offered on http://hawaiidxp.org/data/ to quickly find what you’re looking for? Can cross-sector data answer questions that will better inform your work? Come talk to Hawaii P-20 Data Team members to discuss what questions data can help answer for you.

Hawai‘i Department of Education Data Corner

Have questions about data in the Hawaii Department of Education? Come talk to team members to discuss what we can do to help support you.

Venue

Salvation Army Kroc Center Hawai'i
91-3257 Kualaka'i Parkway
Ewa Beach, HI 96706

Registration

The deadline to register is Friday, May 17, 2019.

Cost

There is no charge to attend this event.

Meals

Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Neighbor Island Travel

Limited funds are available for same-day travel for neighbor island participants (i.e. roundtrip airfare, parking, ground transportation). Requests will be handled in the order they are received.

Special Needs/Requirements

If you have any special needs or requirements in order to attend the summit, please contact our event coordinators.

Cancellations

Should circumstances arise and you are unable to attend, please notify us in advance so we can plan accordingly.

Contact Information

Email: hawaiidxp-events@lists.hawaii.edu


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